Untung99 menawarkan beragam permainan yang menarik, termasuk slot online, poker, roulette, blackjack, dan taruhan olahraga langsung. Dengan koleksi permainan yang lengkap dan terus diperbarui, pemain memiliki banyak pilihan untuk menjaga kegembiraan mereka. Selain itu, Untung99 juga menyediakan bonus dan promosi menarik yang meningkatkan peluang kemenangan dan memberikan nilai tambah kepada pemain.

Berikut adalah artikel atau berita tentang Harian 168megagacor.com dengan judul 168megagacor.com: Alexander Collins 17991867 Find a Grave Memorial yang telah tayang di 168megagacor.com terimakasih telah menyimak. Bila ada masukan atau komplain mengenai artikel berikut silahkan hubungi email kami di koresponden@168megagacor.com, Terimakasih.

Note: The place of death is subjective.

Husband of Jane “Jennie” (Turner), Collins
Father of among others, Matilda (Collins), Garner.

The Troy herald. (Troy, Mo.), 17 May 1876. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

On 17 May 1876 the Troy Herald Newspaper in Lincoln County, Missouri featured an article relating the early day pioneer account of Mrs. Jane Collins, widow of Alexander Collins. It appears they interviewed the aged Jane herself.

Transcribed and reads as follows:

Local & County News
Scraps of County History, Recollections of Mrs. Jane Collins

Mrs. Jane Collins, relict of the late Alexander Collins, believed to be the first white settler of that part of West prairie that lies in Lincoln county, was born in 1797, about six miles from the village of Tazewell, in East Tennessee and eighteen miles from the famous Cumberland Gap.
She was married March 10, 1818 and lived with her husband fifty years, lacking 5 months and twenty-four days, he dying September 6, 1867.
In the fall of 1833 Mr. and Mrs. Collins with their six children, Mrs. Collins brother in-law, Sampson Wombles and his family, her step-father William Turner, his wife and daughter started in a wagon train for Missouri.
(Contributor Edit: Is this referring to a husband of a sister to Alexander Collins or referring to a husband of a sister to Jane? And why does the author not refer to Jane’s mother by name or has her step father remarried? More questions contributor is hoping someone reading this can answer.)


Steamboats were not very plenty in that day. Mrs. Collins says there were fifteen reported being built on the Ohio at Louisville, but only two or three running. The train crossed the Ohio at Louisville and Wabash at Vincennes. This was a good-sized town and a rather pretty place. It was probably as large then as now, it having been long since completed. Opposite Vincennes they entered a place then called Purgatory. Mrs. Collins didn’t know whether the place was rightly named or not as her convictions about the genuine locality are not very decided, but if the truth has been told and the tormenting places of detention is not a myth, then the locality referred to, on the right bank of the Wabash has as appropriate a designation as was ever given any spot. It was a fearful looking place, full of horrid suggestions, and the treacherous roads of wet, stiff, tenacious soil sorely tried the patience of the teamsters.
After an uneventful travel over the flat prairies of Illinois the then small town of Alton was reached. The penitentiary was in process of construction with it’s walls only a few feet from the ground. In consequence of high winds, the ferry boat which was owned by a man named Hayden and run by horse power, had ceased operation for the time being, and the emigrant train had to remain in waiting from Sunday morning till Tuesday Morning. Once over, the train took a line of marh fro Troy by way of St. Charles. The party reached Troy on thge 29th of November.
An acquaintance and former neighbor, Henry Evans lived at that line in the southern edge of Troy and cultivated a small tract of land. The families of Turner and Wombles lodged with Evans and that of the Collins with Evan’s son Joseph who lived nearby. Here they remainned for several days while they could select places to suit them.
Henry Evans died of cholera in 1834. This dread disease was then raging in St. Louis, and the merchant here, who Mrs. Collins thinks was J.N. Robbins, found it almost impossible to procure wagons to fetch goods from St. Louis. He finally prevailed upon Evans and a man named Griffin to go, each with an ox wagon. Evans took his son Samuel and Griffin took his son and Henry Harris, a hired man. On their return Evans was taken with the disease and died after a few hours illness just beyond the Big Creek. A negro man was hired to bury him. Samuel Evans and Griffin were also sick and suffered much with cramps, but managed to keep traveling and soon recovered. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Evans left Troy. She lived a year or two on the farm of her son-in-law James Wombles, eight or ten miles west of this place, and rented a farm to herself. She died about the year 1870 aged eighty five years. Joseph Evans moved to the Niangua river in the south-west part of the state and died shortly afterward, being subject to epilepsy.
Turner’s relatives lived in Boone County. He went up there, made a crop, put his house in order and returned the following fall for his wife and daughter. He and his wife died years ago. Sampson Wombles died in Cuirve, November, 1866. His wife died about the year 1858.
Mrs. & Mrs. Collins moved to the Croce place on Spring Creek near Levi Brown’s. We have been unable to find the exact locality of this place by reference to county records, the only mention of the name we find is that Benj. Croce bought a lot in Troy from Zadock Woods in 1820 and sold it to J.N. Robbinson in 1821. In the last conveyance, Croce is said to be of Troy, but Mrs. Collins says that Croce lived in St. Louis and had an agent to manage the farm; that there was a fine large spring on the place and that to the best of her recollections her nearest neighbor besides Levi Brown was a Mr. Jackson. Collins lived on the Croce place for fourteen months and then rented the Harrison Brunk place for two years. He then bought a farm south of Cuirve near Pressley’s Ford, where he lived for nine years.
In all this time his family suffered so much from Malaria diseases that he left Cuirve and moved to West prairie, November 1849.
He entered four forties “all in a row” as Mrs. Collins said, running north and south being in Sections 26 & 35, Township 50, Range 3, West, and making a farm of a mile long and one-fourth of a mile wide. END OF ARTICLE.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2017 NOTE: The last paragraph above reference to four forties “all in a row” on Sections 26 & 35 have been compared to today’s maps. It was also compared to where the Alexander Collins household was enumerated on the 1850 and 1860 US Census prior to Alex’s 1867 death. Those census records listed the land as Dist.49, (i.e. an enumeration related to land map coordinates), Lincoln County and ten years later what is believed to be the same land parcel is seen enumerated as Prairie, Lincoln County. Lastly after Jane Collins death her probate papers are found filed under “Jennie Collins” in Lincoln County and give information pertaining to land owned by her at the time of her death, subsequent search found a later produced plat map that even has the notation of “Est. Jane Collins” which clearly gives the same coordinates.

By today’s place names, maps and county tax assessments, that land falls under Silex, but am told it is physically about 12 miles from Silex and actually closer to today’s town of Olney which was formerly Nineveh! A local researcher tells physically it is really Olney (Nineveh), but that since Olney has no post office, and Silex does, those living there have addresses listed as Silex and the land is assessed by the county under Silex. Resting along Flamm Rd, the property is still a private rural farm, and the current owners are confirmed NOT TO BE Collins descendants. It appears that at least part of the land was held by descendants until 1939 when a first hand witness states that at that time Alex (possibly meaning Peter) sold to her parents. The informant of that info also stated that Peter Pine and wife Gertie lived just up the road on a piece of land that adjoined the Collins and or it was also part of same.

A land abstract of at least a portion of Alexander and Jane’s original land shows the name Squire L. Pine. Squire Lee Pine is somehow related to Daniel, but it is unclear just how. It notes that Squire’s wife Emmeline relinquished her dowry as they sold it to Alexander Mudd in 1854. Which predates both Jane and Alex’s death and so appears just to be some portion of the 4 – Forties as described elsewhere, but it does seem to be a portion of that property. Later in the abstract paper is the Last Will and Testament of Alexander Pine, known grandson of Alexander and Jane Collins, he was the son of their daughter Martha Ann Collins who married Daniel Pine. If you look at old plat maps the name Alexander Mudd appears on them at least as a neighbor. Likewise one of the maps shows Martha Pine’s name as either a next door neighbor or on a portion of Jane and Alex’s land possibly portioned off and sold at various times. Daniel Pine and Alexander Collins died within a few days of each other as their probate records are side by side in the Lincoln County Probate books interestingly and the burial place of neither is known.

Most of those listed above on Alex Pine’s Last Will (also found on ancestry.com) including his mother Martha and her brother John B. Collins are buried about three miles away from Alex and Jane’s old land at the Fairview Cemetery. Grandson Finley Collins and wife Kate and his mother Armenia (Capps), Collins wife of John B. Collins are there too. It leaves one to wonder if Alex and/or Jane could be buried there as well. We don’t know where for sure Alex died much earlier but we do know Jane died somewhere nearby in Olney/Nineveh at her nephews William C. Wombles home. She having died much later fits the time frame of the earlier burials in the Fairwood Cemetery. It is possible they just don’t have markers or they have crumbled away.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PLEASE CONTACT this contributor if you have any idea where Alexander of Jane Collins are buried and/or if you might know where their daughter Matilda (Collins), Garner and husband Gilford Garner are buried, presumably perhaps in the old Nineveh area. Seeking info regarding Matilda’s daughter Sarah J. Garner as well. We have proof of Alexanders date of death, but no place, Olney (formerly Nineveh) is listed above only because of it’s proximity to the land of which they lastly owned. Jane on the other hand is known to have died in the Nineveh home of her nephew William C. Wombles. So perhaps she too is buried near their land with Alex.

There is another possibility of a burial place for Alex or daughter Matilda Garner, worth looking into and so contributor would also like to enlist the help of any locals there who may know of possible cemeteries in the area described above as south of Cuirve and near Pressley’s Ford of which they lived for nine years prior to moving onto the Four Forties near Olney. I do not know what that area would be referred to as by today’s standards. I feel Matilda could have been buried there and possibly her father Alex, both having died decades ahead of Jane. Research also found that Alex and his son in-law Daniel Pine died within days of each other and have Will and Probate records side by side on the Lincoln County Probate Books. As the article mentions losses due to Malaria, perhaps that is what killed Matilda decades before her father died, but being among the first of the family to pass, maybe they buried Alex near Matilda? Just speculative of course, but thought worth finding out if there were any cemeteries near what used to be called Pressley’s Ford.

Note: The place of death is subjective.

Husband of Jane “Jennie” (Turner), Collins
Father of among others, Matilda (Collins), Garner.

The Troy herald. (Troy, Mo.), 17 May 1876. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

On 17 May 1876 the Troy Herald Newspaper in Lincoln County, Missouri featured an article relating the early day pioneer account of Mrs. Jane Collins, widow of Alexander Collins. It appears they interviewed the aged Jane herself.

Transcribed and reads as follows:

Local & County News
Scraps of County History, Recollections of Mrs. Jane Collins

Mrs. Jane Collins, relict of the late Alexander Collins, believed to be the first white settler of that part of West prairie that lies in Lincoln county, was born in 1797, about six miles from the village of Tazewell, in East Tennessee and eighteen miles from the famous Cumberland Gap.
She was married March 10, 1818 and lived with her husband fifty years, lacking 5 months and twenty-four days, he dying September 6, 1867.
In the fall of 1833 Mr. and Mrs. Collins with their six children, Mrs. Collins brother in-law, Sampson Wombles and his family, her step-father William Turner, his wife and daughter started in a wagon train for Missouri.
(Contributor Edit: Is this referring to a husband of a sister to Alexander Collins or referring to a husband of a sister to Jane? And why does the author not refer to Jane’s mother by name or has her step father remarried? More questions contributor is hoping someone reading this can answer.)


Steamboats were not very plenty in that day. Mrs. Collins says there were fifteen reported being built on the Ohio at Louisville, but only two or three running. The train crossed the Ohio at Louisville and Wabash at Vincennes. This was a good-sized town and a rather pretty place. It was probably as large then as now, it having been long since completed. Opposite Vincennes they entered a place then called Purgatory. Mrs. Collins didn’t know whether the place was rightly named or not as her convictions about the genuine locality are not very decided, but if the truth has been told and the tormenting places of detention is not a myth, then the locality referred to, on the right bank of the Wabash has as appropriate a designation as was ever given any spot. It was a fearful looking place, full of horrid suggestions, and the treacherous roads of wet, stiff, tenacious soil sorely tried the patience of the teamsters.
After an uneventful travel over the flat prairies of Illinois the then small town of Alton was reached. The penitentiary was in process of construction with it’s walls only a few feet from the ground. In consequence of high winds, the ferry boat which was owned by a man named Hayden and run by horse power, had ceased operation for the time being, and the emigrant train had to remain in waiting from Sunday morning till Tuesday Morning. Once over, the train took a line of marh fro Troy by way of St. Charles. The party reached Troy on thge 29th of November.
An acquaintance and former neighbor, Henry Evans lived at that line in the southern edge of Troy and cultivated a small tract of land. The families of Turner and Wombles lodged with Evans and that of the Collins with Evan’s son Joseph who lived nearby. Here they remainned for several days while they could select places to suit them.
Henry Evans died of cholera in 1834. This dread disease was then raging in St. Louis, and the merchant here, who Mrs. Collins thinks was J.N. Robbins, found it almost impossible to procure wagons to fetch goods from St. Louis. He finally prevailed upon Evans and a man named Griffin to go, each with an ox wagon. Evans took his son Samuel and Griffin took his son and Henry Harris, a hired man. On their return Evans was taken with the disease and died after a few hours illness just beyond the Big Creek. A negro man was hired to bury him. Samuel Evans and Griffin were also sick and suffered much with cramps, but managed to keep traveling and soon recovered. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Evans left Troy. She lived a year or two on the farm of her son-in-law James Wombles, eight or ten miles west of this place, and rented a farm to herself. She died about the year 1870 aged eighty five years. Joseph Evans moved to the Niangua river in the south-west part of the state and died shortly afterward, being subject to epilepsy.
Turner’s relatives lived in Boone County. He went up there, made a crop, put his house in order and returned the following fall for his wife and daughter. He and his wife died years ago. Sampson Wombles died in Cuirve, November, 1866. His wife died about the year 1858.
Mrs. & Mrs. Collins moved to the Croce place on Spring Creek near Levi Brown’s. We have been unable to find the exact locality of this place by reference to county records, the only mention of the name we find is that Benj. Croce bought a lot in Troy from Zadock Woods in 1820 and sold it to J.N. Robbinson in 1821. In the last conveyance, Croce is said to be of Troy, but Mrs. Collins says that Croce lived in St. Louis and had an agent to manage the farm; that there was a fine large spring on the place and that to the best of her recollections her nearest neighbor besides Levi Brown was a Mr. Jackson. Collins lived on the Croce place for fourteen months and then rented the Harrison Brunk place for two years. He then bought a farm south of Cuirve near Pressley’s Ford, where he lived for nine years.
In all this time his family suffered so much from Malaria diseases that he left Cuirve and moved to West prairie, November 1849.
He entered four forties “all in a row” as Mrs. Collins said, running north and south being in Sections 26 & 35, Township 50, Range 3, West, and making a farm of a mile long and one-fourth of a mile wide. END OF ARTICLE.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2017 NOTE: The last paragraph above reference to four forties “all in a row” on Sections 26 & 35 have been compared to today’s maps. It was also compared to where the Alexander Collins household was enumerated on the 1850 and 1860 US Census prior to Alex’s 1867 death. Those census records listed the land as Dist.49, (i.e. an enumeration related to land map coordinates), Lincoln County and ten years later what is believed to be the same land parcel is seen enumerated as Prairie, Lincoln County. Lastly after Jane Collins death her probate papers are found filed under “Jennie Collins” in Lincoln County and give information pertaining to land owned by her at the time of her death, subsequent search found a later produced plat map that even has the notation of “Est. Jane Collins” which clearly gives the same coordinates.

By today’s place names, maps and county tax assessments, that land falls under Silex, but am told it is physically about 12 miles from Silex and actually closer to today’s town of Olney which was formerly Nineveh! A local researcher tells physically it is really Olney (Nineveh), but that since Olney has no post office, and Silex does, those living there have addresses listed as Silex and the land is assessed by the county under Silex. Resting along Flamm Rd, the property is still a private rural farm, and the current owners are confirmed NOT TO BE Collins descendants. It appears that at least part of the land was held by descendants until 1939 when a first hand witness states that at that time Alex (possibly meaning Peter) sold to her parents. The informant of that info also stated that Peter Pine and wife Gertie lived just up the road on a piece of land that adjoined the Collins and or it was also part of same.

A land abstract of at least a portion of Alexander and Jane’s original land shows the name Squire L. Pine. Squire Lee Pine is somehow related to Daniel, but it is unclear just how. It notes that Squire’s wife Emmeline relinquished her dowry as they sold it to Alexander Mudd in 1854. Which predates both Jane and Alex’s death and so appears just to be some portion of the 4 – Forties as described elsewhere, but it does seem to be a portion of that property. Later in the abstract paper is the Last Will and Testament of Alexander Pine, known grandson of Alexander and Jane Collins, he was the son of their daughter Martha Ann Collins who married Daniel Pine. If you look at old plat maps the name Alexander Mudd appears on them at least as a neighbor. Likewise one of the maps shows Martha Pine’s name as either a next door neighbor or on a portion of Jane and Alex’s land possibly portioned off and sold at various times. Daniel Pine and Alexander Collins died within a few days of each other as their probate records are side by side in the Lincoln County Probate books interestingly and the burial place of neither is known.

Most of those listed above on Alex Pine’s Last Will (also found on ancestry.com) including his mother Martha and her brother John B. Collins are buried about three miles away from Alex and Jane’s old land at the Fairview Cemetery. Grandson Finley Collins and wife Kate and his mother Armenia (Capps), Collins wife of John B. Collins are there too. It leaves one to wonder if Alex and/or Jane could be buried there as well. We don’t know where for sure Alex died much earlier but we do know Jane died somewhere nearby in Olney/Nineveh at her nephews William C. Wombles home. She having died much later fits the time frame of the earlier burials in the Fairwood Cemetery. It is possible they just don’t have markers or they have crumbled away.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PLEASE CONTACT this contributor if you have any idea where Alexander of Jane Collins are buried and/or if you might know where their daughter Matilda (Collins), Garner and husband Gilford Garner are buried, presumably perhaps in the old Nineveh area. Seeking info regarding Matilda’s daughter Sarah J. Garner as well. We have proof of Alexanders date of death, but no place, Olney (formerly Nineveh) is listed above only because of it’s proximity to the land of which they lastly owned. Jane on the other hand is known to have died in the Nineveh home of her nephew William C. Wombles. So perhaps she too is buried near their land with Alex.

There is another possibility of a burial place for Alex or daughter Matilda Garner, worth looking into and so contributor would also like to enlist the help of any locals there who may know of possible cemeteries in the area described above as south of Cuirve and near Pressley’s Ford of which they lived for nine years prior to moving onto the Four Forties near Olney. I do not know what that area would be referred to as by today’s standards. I feel Matilda could have been buried there and possibly her father Alex, both having died decades ahead of Jane. Research also found that Alex and his son in-law Daniel Pine died within days of each other and have Will and Probate records side by side on the Lincoln County Probate Books. As the article mentions losses due to Malaria, perhaps that is what killed Matilda decades before her father died, but being among the first of the family to pass, maybe they buried Alex near Matilda? Just speculative of course, but thought worth finding out if there were any cemeteries near what used to be called Pressley’s Ford.

Read More